How to get involved

Getting your Fundraising started

Ten simple steps to getting that sponsorship rolling in

  1. Read the Fundraising Pack – It will tell you everything you need to know. Download it here »
  2. Set up an online fundraising page – follow this link, it’s quick and easy.
  3. Once your page is set up, download the Virgin Money Giving ap. This allows you to track where your fundraising is at but more importantly you can badger people with it in the pub to sponsor you.
  4. Contact all your friends, family, colleagues, suppliers, and basically everyone you know and ask that they sponsor you on this challenge and let them know the difference their support will make.
  5. Go social! Make sure to get the message out on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and any other social networks you have. Be sure to link it to Ambitious about Autism’s Facebook page and Twitter feed. The more people who hear about what you are doing the quicker you will hit that target!
  6. If you work for a company ask if they have a matched giving policy or another employee fundraising scheme. These schemes will often match your fundraising £1 for £1. Also some company donations may be tax deductible.
  7. Organise an event, or have a clear out. This doesn’t have to be time consuming and can be a great boost to your sponsorship total. Get your friends and family involved to help with organising a pub quiz or dinner party or simply sell some old bike parts on Ebay.
  8. Make sure to thank those that sponsor you, and keep on asking! It can take up to three asks before some one gets round to actually sponsoring you.
  9. Don’t be a stranger! Ambitious about Autism are here to help! If you have any questions or need advice on fundraising, autism or the services they provide then grab the phone (0208 815 5444) and ask for Jay, or drop them an email at jhunt@ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk
  10. And don’t forget… ask, ask and ask again! People won‘t be offended, they’re often just busy and forget.

FAQ

How much money do I have to raise for Ambitious about Autism?
We ask each rider to raise as much as they can, with a fundraising target of £750. There are many ways this can be achieved and it’s easier than you think.

Does the registration fee go towards the sponsorship target?

No. The registration fee covers the event running costs. Any remaining money will be donated to Ambitious about Autism. This a not-for-profit event.

When do I need to raise the £750 by?
We ask that you raise the majority by the 4th September, but you can continue fundraising if you wish to raise more to hit or exceed your target.

£750 is quite a lot of money, what if I fail to reach the target?
If you do not reach the target you will still be able to do the ride, and will not be kicked off the challenge. You will have the opportunity to continue fundraising after the event to reach the target if you have not reached it by the 6th September. Our goal is to raise £150,000 for Ambitious about Autism and the suggested target of £750 per participant will help us reach it.

How much of £1 raised for Ambitious about Autism goes towards their services?
90p of every £1 Ambitious about Autism spends funds services, policy, research and campaigning.

Where is my money going?
Your money will go towards securing a brighter future for young people with Autism. For more information about the charity, Ambitious about Autism see here »

What can I do to fundraise?

  • You can set up an online donation page. They’re a really quick and easy way to get people supporting you.
  • Organise a Krispy Kreme donut sale at work. For a charity sale you can buy a dozen box for £8.95, which you can sell on at £1.45 a donut – making you a profit of £8.45 a box.
  • Speak to your employer – some companies will offer a matched giving scheme where they will match any donation given to you up to a certain point.
  • Go social – promote your online fundraising page on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Hit the pub with a sponsorship form.
  • One of the biggest things is to ask, ask and then ask again! Everyone is busy, so often they mean to support you but simply forget, it often takes up to three asks for people to remember to support you.
  • You can get more ideas and download sponsorship forms from Ambitious about Autism.

How do I set up an online fundraising page?
It’s simple, click here and follow the instructions. Once your page is set up you can email it out to all of your contacts and ask for their support. It’s a great way of reaching out to people and tracking your fundraising progress.

How do I pay my sponsorship in?
Online pages: If you’ve set up an online donation page such as Virgin Money Giving or JustGiving the funds will automatically be transferred to Ambitious about Autism.

Cheques: Please post any cheques along with a note to explain who they are from and what they are for to: Jay Hunt, Ambitious about Autism, The Pears National Centre for Autism Education, Woodside Avenue, London N10 3JA.

Please note cheques should be made out to: Ambitious about Autism

Cash: Please do not post cash to the charity. If you have a cash donations please pay them into your own bank account and contact the charity to arrange a BACs transfer.

How do I contact the charity?
You can contact Ambitious about Autism via email (jhunt@ambitiousboutautism.org.uk) or by phone on 0208 815 5444 and ask for Jay Hunt.

What is the registered charity number for Ambitious about Autism?
1063184

Other pages

Read the training guide »

Read the essential information page »

Question still not answered? For any other queries please email m2l@rapha.cc

From the Rapha Blog

  1. From Manchester to London

    Words: | Photography: Wig Worland | Date:

    Rapha hosted the inaugural Manchester to London Challenge, an event that saw 136 riders complete a 220-mile trip over the Peaks, through the Midlands and into London in just one day, raising funds for Ambitious about Autism. Here Emma Osenton, the route’s designer, and Simon Mottram, Rapha CEO, share their thoughts on completing the ride, followed by a video of the day’s action.

    Read the entire post »

  2. Manchester to London Results 2014

    Words: | Date:

    The results are in after Sunday’s Manchester To London ride, and it appears that the North are, on average, three minutes slower than their friends from the South. A more in-depth round-up of the day will follow shortly, but until then here are the day’s results. As always, we’d like to thank the marshals, mechanics and medics who did so much to make the day run so smoothly, and the riders who raised money for Ambitious About Autism.

    Read the entire post »

  3. The Road More Travelled

    Words: David Harmon | Photography: Elliot Jones | Date:

    There is a part of me that eschews gadgets and gizmos, rejects outright the reliance of riders on Garmins, Strava and even at times on the humble map. A belligerent part of me instinctively bridles at the facility of these devices to control me and take away my freedom to sit up, look about, and enjoy the journey rather than the efficiencies of getting there.

    Read the entire post »